Prof. Elizabeth Warren Appointed to Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

For years, no one at the federal level has done much to help ordinary consumers. Some federal agencies (the bank regulators especially) have worked for the banks against consumers.

Congress (really the Democrats in Congress) approved Obama’s financial reform bill (the Dodd-Frank law). The law created a Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Prof. Elizabeth Warren, an outstanding advocate for consumers, conceived the idea in the first place.

This week, President Obama appointed Prof. Warren to launch the CFPB. Prof Warren released a statement in which she states she has enthusiastically agreed to take on the job:

“President Obama understands the importance of leveling the playing field again for families and creating protections that work not just for the wealthy or connected, but for every American. The new consumer bureau is based on a pretty simple idea: people ought to be able to read their credit card and mortgage contracts and know the deal. They shouldn’t learn about an unfair rule or practice only when it bites them—way too late for them to do anything about it. The new law creates a chance to put a tough cop on the beat and provide real accountability and oversight of the consumer credit market. The time for hiding tricks and traps in the fine print is over. This new bureau is based on the simple idea that if the playing field is level and families can see what’s going on, they will have better tools to make better choices.

If the CFPB can succeed at leveling the playing field, we can go a long way toward repairing a gaping hole in the budgets of millions of families. But nobody has ever thought or argued that the consumer bureau can fix everything. Lost jobs, stagnant incomes, rising costs for college, dwindling retirement savings—there’s a lot of work to be done.

When she was 16, my grandmother, Hannie Reed, drove a wagon in the Oklahoma land rush. Her mother had died, so she was up front with her little brothers and sisters bouncing around in the back. When I was growing up, she talked about life on the prairie, about marrying my grandfather and making a living building one-room schoolhouses, about getting wiped out in the Great Depression. She was hit with hard challenges throughout her life, but the moral of her stories was always the same: she would solve her problems one at a time by pulling up her socks and getting to work.

“It’s time for all of us to pull up our socks and get to work.”

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